Acquired amputation and prostheses
before the sixteenth century

by
Padula PA, Friedmann LW.
Angiology. 1987 Feb;38(2 Pt 1):133-41.


ABSTRACT

Amputation has been practiced at least since 43,000 B.C.E. for ritualistic, punitive, curative, or vocational reasons. Fitting with prostheses has been done since at least 1,500 B.C.E. Anesthetics were used, but which ones is not known. Analgesics such as salicylates in plants, narcotics such as cocaine and opium, and soporifics such as alcohol and peyote were common. Amputation was done with knives, axes, and saws. Control of bleeding was by ligature, cautery, bandaging pressure, and plant and animal products. Suture was with cotton or human hair, acacia and other thorns, ant jaws, and sinew, with or without a drain. Prostheses were made of fiber, wood, bone, and metals, often lined with rags.
People
Amputation
Eternal pain?
Scopolamine
Brain microtubules
Obstetric anaesthesia
Molecular mechanisms
The spongia somnifera
'My beloved chloroform'
'The secularisation of pain'



Refs
and further reading

general-anaesthesia.com
HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
erythroxylum-coca.com
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhappiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Good Drug Guide
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World