When pharmacologic anesthesia is precluded: the value of hypnosis as a sole anesthetic agent in dentistry
by
Kleinhauz M, Eli I.
Section of Behavioral Sciences,
The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School
of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.
Spec Care Dentist. 1993 Jan-Feb;13(1):15-8.


ABSTRACT

Occasionally, a dental patient presents his/her dentist with a history of hypersensitivity to local anesthetic agents. The symptoms may include immediate reactions to the injection procedure (dizziness, shortness of breath, tachycardia, etc), or delayed reactions to the anesthetic (swelling, urticaria, etc). Although the true incidence of local anesthetic allergy is low, such a history often involves the patient's anxiety regarding the use of the drug in question, and the dentist's apprehension to treat the "problematic" patient. In such cases, hypnosis can play a major role in controlling pain and the associated distress. In the present article, the method concerning the implementation of hypnosis to induce local anesthesia is described and illustrated through case demonstrations.
People
Hypnosis
Anaesthesia
Obstetric anesthesia
Molecular mechanisms
Chloroform anaesthesia
Franklin Commission Report
Anton Mesmer and Mesmerism
Etienne Felix d'Henin de Cuvillers and hypnosis
Modern medicine and Mesmerism minus the magic



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