Midazolam, a new intravenous
induction agent for anaesthesia

by
Holloway AM, Brock-Utne JG,
Sommerville TE, Pavy TJ.
S Afr Med J. 1982 Feb 20;61(8):274-6


ABSTRACT

In an open non-comparative clinical trial 64 patients older than 18 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists ratings of I and II were studied. Under standardized conditions of premedication, anaesthesia was induced by injecting midazolam (Ro 21-3981) 0,15 or 0,3 mg/kg body weight intravenously. After endotracheal intubation with suxamethonium 1 mg/kg, anaesthesia was maintained with nitrous oxide in oxygen and enflurane or halothane. There were statistically significant cardiovascular changes during and/or after intubation but there were no clinical consequences. Midazolam allows rapid induction of and recovery from anaesthesia. There was no retrograde amnesia and high proportion of the patients assessed the induction of anaesthesia as favourable. The local tolerance was very good. Midazolam seems to be a good alternative for induction of balanced anaesthesia.
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