Analgesic nitrous oxide in neuropsychiatry:
past, present and future

by
Gillman MA,
Lichtigfeld FJ.
South African Brain Research Institute,
Johannesburg.
Int J Neurosci. 1989 Nov;49(1-2):75-81.


ABSTRACT

We highlight the distinction between analgesic and anesthetic concentrations of nitrous oxide, with special reference to the safety of analgesic nitrous oxide. We present evidence that the gas at analgesic concentrations is an opioid agonist. Its extremely low abuse potential, despite its opioid properties, is discussed with regard to its evanescent action and possible partial agonistic effects, making it the least addictive of all mind-altering addictive substances. The activities of analgesic nitrous oxide make it an almost ideal agent with which to investigate the functions of the opioid system in man. We also discuss its use as a diagnostic and therapeutic agent in neuropsychiatry.
People
Entonox
Nitrous oxide
NO/dopamine
Inhaled anaesthetics
Rats on nitrous oxide
Nitrous oxide inhalation
200 years of laughing gas
Nitrous oxide plus ethanol
Nitrous oxide and frostbite
Nitrous oxide and marijuana
Nitrous oxide / opioid release
Nitrous oxide: adverse effects
Beta-endorphin/nitrous oxide withdrawal
Nitrous oxide - subjective and rewarding effects
Prolonged nitrous oxide exposure and neuron death
Whipped cream bulbs cause nitrous oxide myelopathy



Refs
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general-anaesthesia.com
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