Dr Nooth and his apparatus. The role of carbon dioxide in medicine in the late eighteenth century
by
Zuck D.
Br J Anaesth. 1978 Apr;50(4):393-405


ABSTRACT

The two earliest inhalers devised for the administration of ether anaesthesia in the U.K. (Hooper's and Squire's apparatus) both incorporated the bottom part of a Nooth's apparatus. This, which was once a household object, is now remembered only as a footnote in one or two specialist histories, and Nooth himself, who was a most distinguished and respected medical man in his day, is almost completely forgotten. Yet there are many aspects of Nooth's life that are of great interest, and his apparatus was one of the very first to be designed to produce, for medicinal purposes, what may inclusively be called carbonated waters; and, surprisingly, there are strong links of coincidence between the histories of artificial mineral waters and of anesthesia, and the personalia involved in each.
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Inhaled anaesthetics
Obstetric anaesthesia
Molecular mechanisms
Chloroform anaesthesia
A thalamocortical switch?
Anaesthesia and the spinal chord
History of anaesthesia apparatus
Consciousness, anaesthesia and anaesthetics
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Refs
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general-anaesthesia.com
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