Parkinson's disease and anaesthesia
by
Nicholson G, Pereira AC, Hall GM.
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine,
St George's Hospital Medical School,
Cranmer Terrace,
London SW17 0RE, UK.
gnichols@sghms.ac.uk
Br J Anaesth. 2002 Dec;89(6):904-16.


ABSTRACT

Parkinson's disease is an increasingly common disease of elderly patients who present a particular anaesthetic challenge. This review explores the epidemiology, aetiology, pathogenesis, and pathophysiology of the condition, particularly the possible role of genetic factors. The clinical features are described in detail and recent advances in medical management are highlighted. Controversies surrounding the use of the newer drugs and possible advances in neurosurgical interventions are discussed. Particular anaesthetic problems in patients with Parkinson's disease are respiratory, cardiovascular, and neurological. Potential drug interactions are described and recommendations are made about suitable anaesthetic techniques.
People
Anaesthesia
Adverse effects
Parkinson's disease
Obstetric anaesthesia
Molecular mechanisms
Inhalational techniques
'The secularisation of pain'
Anaesthesia: rivalries and discoveries
Volatile anaesthetics immobilise sensitive plant



Refs
and further reading

general-anaesthesia.com
HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
erythroxylum-coca.com
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhappiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Good Drug Guide
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World