Sexual hallucinations during and
after sedation and anaesthesia

by
Balasubramaniam B, Park GR.
The John Farman Intensive Care Unit,
Box 17, Addenbrookes NHS Trust,
Hills Road, Cambridge,
CB2 2QQ, UK.
Anaesthesia. 2003 Jun;58(6):549-53


ABSTRACT

Sexual hallucinations have been reported since the introduction of chloroform. Newer agents such as midazolam and propofol appear particularly prone to producing them. Some practitioners have been the victims of allegations resulting from the hallucinogenic effects of these drugs. Other individuals, including doctors, have used the amnesic effects of midazolam and other drugs to sexually assault victims. Clinicians should be aware of the risks to which they may inadvertently expose themselves if these drugs are not used carefully.
People
Anaesthesia
Nitrous oxide
Inhaled anaesthetics
Obstetric anaesthesia
Molecular mechanisms
Chloroform anaesthesia
A thalamocortical switch?
Anaesthesia and the spinal chord
History of anaesthesia apparatus
Consciousness, anaesthesia and anaesthetics
Anaesthesia: mutants in yeast, nematodes, fruit flies and mice



Refs
and further reading

general-anaesthesia.com
HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
erythroxylum-coca.com
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhappiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Good Drug Guide
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World