Volatile anesthetics
by
Loscar M, Conzen P.
Klinik fur Anaesthesiologie
der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen,
Munchen. Monika.Loscar@med.uni-muenchen.de
Anaesthesist. 2004 Feb;53(2):183-98


ABSTRACT

None of the currently available inhaled anesthetics has all of the properties of an "ideal" inhaled agent. The exceptionally low solubility of desflurane and sevoflurane offers a significantly greater precision of control over maintenance of anesthesia and a potential for a more rapid recovery from anesthesia than other inhaled anesthetics. Sevoflurane appears to offer some advantages regarding cardiovascular stability. Products of metabolism or degradation can be associated with potential organ-specific toxic effects. Renal toxicity is discussed for enflurane and sevoflurane. Breakdown products of volatile agents with carbon dioxide absorbents have to be mentioned especially for sevoflurane (compound A) and desflurane (CO). In contrast to intravenous anesthetics, volatile anesthetics are associated with cardio- and cerebroprotection.
People
Anaesthesia
Nitrous oxide
Horace Wells
William Morton
Inhaled anaesthetics
Obstetric anaesthesia
Molecular mechanisms
Chloroform anaesthesia
A thalamocortical switch?
Anaesthesia/16th October 1846
Consciousness, anaesthesia and anaesthetics
First use of anaesthetics in different countries



Refs
and further reading

general-anaesthesia.com
HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
Cocaine.org
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhappiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Good Drug Guide
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World